Featured Database – Newsbank: America’s Newspapers

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PJStar

Access the Peoria Journal Star online by clicking here!

To search and read newspapers from throughout Illinois, click here.

To access newspapers from throughout the country, including the Wall Street Journal, Peoria Journal Star, USA Today, and Washington Post, click here. 

New to E-Books or Need Help?

  DPLD offers e-book and e-reader workshops; check the event calendar to see what we have coming up. Sign up for a one-on-one tutorial for help with your device. If you are reading e-books on certain e-readers, you’ll need to download Adobe Digital Editions. If you are using an Apple or Android mobile device, tablet, Kindle Fire, or Nook Tablet, you’ll need to download the OverDrive Media Console App. See a list of compatible devices.

CACTUS Club @ Your Library

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Creative Artists & Crafters Tackle Unfinished Stuff Club

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Usually the 1st Friday of the month from 10:00 until noon (drop-in style). Meets September – June.

Our next meeting will be on Friday, February 16.

The meeting room for our next CACTUS Club gathering will be open from 10 to noon to work on all of your unfinished projects. Our challenge reveal, should you choose to participate, will be at 10:30!

We provide the tables…you bring your unfinished projects to work on. Meet others to share ideas & learn new techniques!

Hope you can join us. Bring a friend!

Knit & Stitch @ Your Library

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Meet new people as you work on a fresh project or finish that UFO that’s been sitting around a while. New knitters and crocheters and other needle crafters welcome…friendly help is here!

Meets on the 2nd Friday of the month 10:30 – 11:30 am.

Our next meeting will be on Friday, March 9.

“Who Picked This?” Book Club

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We usually meet on the third Tuesday of the month at 10 am.

On Tuesday, February 20 we will be discussing Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell.

A postmodern visionary and one of the leading voices in twenty-first-century fiction, David Mitchell combines flat-out adventure, a Nabokovian love of puzzles, a keen eye for character, and a taste for mind-bending, philosophical and scientific speculation in the tradition of Umberto Eco, Haruki Murakami, and Philip K. Dick. The result is brilliantly original fiction as profound as it is playful. In this groundbreaking novel, an influential favorite among a new generation of writers, Mitchell explores with daring artistry fundamental questions of reality and identity.

Cloud Atlas begins in 1850 with Adam Ewing, an American notary voyaging from the Chatham Isles to his home in California. Along the way, Ewing is befriended by a physician, Dr. Goose, who begins to treat him for a rare species of brain parasite. . . . Abruptly, the action jumps to Belgium in 1931, where Robert Frobisher, a disinherited bisexual composer, contrives his way into the household of an infirm maestro who has a beguiling wife and a nubile daughter. . . . From there we jump to the West Coast in the 1970s and a troubled reporter named Luisa Rey, who stumbles upon a web of corporate greed and murder that threatens to claim her life. . . . And onward, with dazzling virtuosity, to an inglorious present-day England; to a Korean superstate of the near future where neocapitalism has run amok; and, finally, to a postapocalyptic Iron Age Hawaii in the last days of history.

But the story doesn’t end even there. The narrative then boomerangs back through centuries and space, returning by the same route, in reverse, to its starting point. Along the way, Mitchell reveals how his disparate characters connect, how their fates intertwine, and how their souls drift across time like clouds across the sky.

–Amazon

March 20:  One Thousand White Women: The Journals of Mary Dodd by Jim Fergus

7•Ups Book Club

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This group meets on the 4th Thursday at 11:00 during February, March, April, May, August, September, and October.

Title: Mistress of the Art of Death (Mistress of the Art of Death Series #1), Author: Ariana Franklin

On Thursday, October 27 we’ll be discussing Mistress of the Art of Death by Ariana Franklin

Synopsis from Barnes & Noble…

The national bestselling hit hailed by the New York Times as a “vibrant medieval mystery…[it] outdoes the competition.”

In medieval Cambridge, England, Adelia, a female forensics expert, is summoned by King Henry II to investigate a series of gruesome murders that has wrongly implicated the Jewish population, yielding even more tragic results. As Adelia’s investigation takes her behind the closed doors of the country’s churches, the killer prepares to strike again.

Monday Morning Book Club

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Kids play while the adults discuss the book club selection!  We usually meet on the 2nd Monday at 9:30 in the morning. Meets September – June.

Our next book is Fish in a Tree by Lynda Mullaly Hunt that we’ll discuss at 9:30 on Monday, March 12.

Ally has been smart enough to fool a lot of smart people. Every time she lands in a new school, she is able to hide her inability to read by creating clever yet disruptive distractions.  She is afraid to ask for help; after all, how can you cure dumb? However, her newest teacher Mr. Daniels sees the bright, creative kid underneath the trouble maker. With his help, Ally learns not to be so hard on herself and that dyslexia is nothing to be ashamed of. As her confidence grows, Ally feels free to be herself and the world starts opening up with possibilities. She discovers that there’s a lot more to her—and to everyone—than a label, and that great minds don’t always think alike.

The author of the beloved One for the Murphys gives readers an emotionally-charged, uplifting novel that will speak to anyone who’s ever thought there was something wrong with them because they didn’t fit in.

– Amazon

April 9:  The Color Purple by Alice Walker

Page Turners

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Meets on the first Thursday of the month at 1 pm.

 

Thursday, March 1 at 1:00

Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders

February 1862. The Civil War is less than one year old. The fighting has begun in earnest, and the nation has begun to realize it is in for a long, bloody struggle. Meanwhile, President Lincoln’s beloved eleven-year-old son, Willie, lies upstairs in the White House, gravely ill. In a matter of days, despite predictions of a recovery, Willie dies and is laid to rest in a Georgetown cemetery. “My poor boy, he was too good for this earth,” the president says at the time. “God has called him home.” Newspapers report that a grief-stricken Lincoln returns, alone, to the crypt several times to hold his boy’s body.

From that seed of historical truth, George Saunders spins an unforgettable story of familial love and loss that breaks free of its realistic, historical framework into a supernatural realm both hilarious and terrifying. Willie Lincoln finds himself in a strange purgatory where ghosts mingle, gripe, commiserate, quarrel, and enact bizarre acts of penance. Within this transitional state—called, in the Tibetan tradition, the bardo—a monumental struggle erupts over young Willie’s soul.

Lincoln in the Bardo
 is an astonishing feat of imagination and a bold step forward from one of the most important and influential writers of his generation. Formally daring, generous in spirit, deeply concerned with matters of the heart, it is a testament to fiction’s ability to speak honestly and powerfully to the things that really matter to us. Saunders has invented a thrilling new form that deploys a kaleidoscopic, theatrical panorama of voices to ask a timeless, profound question: How do we live and love when we know that everything we love must end?

Amazon

 

April 5 – The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro

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